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Learn About The Pieces In The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Heist

Art is a universal language. You must have heard this line at point or another. Art is a window into the past while standing in the future. It is very difficult to quantify what exactly art means to a lot of people, but I can tell you what it meant to Isabella Stewart.  

Art was her passion. She wanted everyone else to share in her passion as well and so came into existence The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. In her own words, the museum exists for the “for the education and enjoyment of the public forever.” 

But art is valuable and human greed knows no bounds and so, we have the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist. In 1990, somebody stole thirteen pieces from the museum. Those pieces have not even surfaced anywhere on the planet. So, tuck into these THC Vapes from Observer and have a look at the pieces that were stolen. 

The Concert -Johannes Vermeer 

This is one of the rarest and the most valuable of the lost treasures in the list. Partly because so few of Vermeer’s work exists. The estimation is at around 37 with questions still on three of them. 

The concert is both a characteristic painting as well as an uncharacteristic painting. It is characteristic because of the musical instruments and the women in the painting. But uncharacteristic as there are three people in the frame. 

A Lady And Gentleman In Black – Rembrandt van Rijn 

Every Rembrandt that was a part of the Gardner collection was a product of the early 1630s. When he was just 26 or 27 years old.  Most couples that Rembrandt painted were actually pendants, where two separate canvases portray one half of a married couple. 

This painting is however different.  This is a double portrait that has both figures on the same canvas. It is also really big, somewhere around 4 feet high and 3 feet wide. The delicate detailing on the painting is what Rembrandt was known for at that time of his carrier.

Christ In The Storm On The Sea Of Galilee  – Rembrandt van Rijn

This was the only seascape that Rembrandt painted and this one is dramatically opposite to what the couple was. Ofen called his most dramatic and dynamic images. The canvas is about 5 feet high and 4 feet wide, if you ever look at it, it seems like you can touch the water. It is that surreal. 

The brushstrokes on this painting are broad, wild, and windswept splashes all across. 

Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man- Rembrandt van Rijn 

The thieves really went for his work. This tiny itching was a Rembrandt wonder. A self-portrait is the closest to what we have to figure out what he looked like. There is a certain amount of mystery attached to why he had sketched himself a certain way. Not even 30 at the time he looks pudgy, unkempt and a little scraggly in the picture. 

Landscape With Obelisk – Givaert Flink 

For the longest time, it was thought that this is a landscape by Rembrandt. But this haunting little landscape is by Givaert Flink. Oil on wood this painting is a work of art that gives the feeling of exquisite, sweet pathos and profoundness. 

The subject of this painting is still a mystery. Its namesake, the obelisk seems to represent something at least want to represent something. The point is clear, we have no choice but to leave everything to our imagination. 

Chez Tortoni – Edouard Manet

This is another small canvas painting that was in the blue room when it was stolen. Manet painted this at peak maturity when he was in his 40s. So this is a work from his more mature years. Though Manet is more famous for his bigger and more sexually daring works, his smaller works-a lemon and a stick or asparagus are great as well. 

These are the most known works that people search for and have been searching for almost 30 years.  Today their collective value is upwards of half a million dollars. Most of the frames still hang in the museum awaiting the return of the prized paintings. 

Till date, no arrests regarding the case have been made and it still remains to be seen if the largen unsolved art crime ever does get solved.